Winter Color

In many months of the year I question the fashion industry, but none so much as January. It is cold, dark and raining, and yet everywhere I look spring fabrics flutter seductively. “Spring is coming,” they whisper, “a sleeveless dress is just what you need.”

Yes, technically spring is coming, what with the orbitting of the earth and all. But the 2020 summer Olympics are also also coming, and I’m not exactly preparing my wardrobe. Warm weather is a long way off here in Oregon.

In all honesty, January can feel like a bit of a bummer, fashion-wise. The rich colors and cozy plaids that felt so relevant through November and December seem a little stale now.

The trick to blowing off our winter fashion blues is to use color, rather than style or fabric, to express our longing for warmer months. Comb your closet for clothing that is warm and cozy, but with colors that point us towards spring. We can all wear satisfying ensembles throughout the winter without giving in to an airy tank top before it is time.

Here are a few color combinations to pull you out of your winter doldrums, along with some of my favorite mid-winter pieces.

Cognac and Denim

I’m pretending to be an extra in Thelma and Louise.

I always love this southwest-inspired combination, but never so much as in the middle of winter. If I’m not actually in a the American Southwest hiking through sun-baked canyons, at least I look like I could be.

Spring green and deep brown

So I like to dress like my garden? I just avoid anything striped and/or a red hat, and there’s no chance of looking like a gnome.

Spring green is such a fun color. Paired with brown you can brave the mud of February and still look sharp.

Pink and grey

Pink and grey remains a January/February classic. Soft fabrics and knits are toasty warm while the colors are soothing and easy. A little 1950s, a little 1980s, it’s all good in pink and grey.

Other fun winter combinations are black and teal, cream and light blue, and navy and white.

My winter favorites

I have several pieces that keep me style-positive through these dark months. Here are a few favs:

Talbot’s Heart Sweater

I’m pretty sure I longed for this exact sweater my entire 5th grade year.
Hearts!!!

I love this sweater. It is so easy to wear, a perfect weight for indoors, but it can easily be layered if I am heading outside.

Soft-color plaid flannel chores shirt

Thanks Owen!

My son bought me this shirt for Christmas. The cheerful colors make this chores top perfect for winter. Most Saturdays I can be found wearing this top while I muck around with my family and goats. It’s warm and uplifting.

A seriously warm Stio coat with bright pink lining

My please-let-it-be-cold coat.
Look, there’s a pink pineapple on the back! Or a pinecone. Or whatever.

My forever down jacket is from Stio, and while it is practical six ways to Sunday (water proof, down fill, all sorts of ventilating, etc, etc) it also has a bright pink lining that is so unexpected it makes me giggle, leaving me warm and happy.

Pink Patagonia Puffer Vest

 

 

This puffer has gotten a lot of play on this blog. I do apologize for reusing the pictures but it is such a great piece. You probably have something similar, a lucky thrift store find that you pull out year after year.

Bright green jacket

Keeping things merry and bright long after the holidays are over.

I bought this green jacket to wear to my son’s football games (his school colors are green and white) As it turns out I wear it everywhere, all year round: Track meets in the spring, cold nights camping in the summer, football in the fall, instead of a sweater in the winter. In all honesty this is not a great color on me but I really don’t care. The color puts me in a good mood and the nanopuff keeps me cozy.

I can belay my husband on his project in this jacket, too!

With a little fortitude, and a lot of color, we can make these winter months as fashionably fun as any other time. Go raid your closet and see what you can find!

Do you have a favorite winter color combination, or an article of clothing that gets you through the first months of the year? Please tell us about it in the comments below.

Hey mom, did you know that the outcome of my sporting events has absolutely nothing to do with the color of your jacket? It’s true. Also the ref doesn’t seem to be taking your advice, so you can stop yelling now.

Eight “must-have” wardrobe basics you probably don’t need, and nine you might

I don’t own a little black dress. And yet, I manage to get myself clothed and out of the house daily without this magic-bullet of a wardrobe basic. How is this possible?

Basics are the items that allow our wardrobes to function. They are like the oil in our cars or the framing in our homes, absolutely necessary but not terribly exciting. So when I wanted to put my wardrobe in order I googled “wardrobe basics.” The internet responded with the same list over and over again. Black wool pants? Sigh. Ballet flats? So not me.

If I were an executive working in a high-rise office in NYC, I have no doubt these lists would be very helpful. But there is nowhere in my school-teaching, goat-herding, soaking-wet-track-meet- standing life for a pair of statement heels.

What follows is a list of traditional basics and my take on a piece that would serve a similar purpose, but be more functional in an active woman’s wardrobe. The Mud and Grace basics allow me to ride my bike to work, run around the classroom pretending to be on the Silk Road, meet my family for dinner and maybe hop in the car for a last-minute weekend road trip. These basics will not take you from the boardroom to a hip nightclub, because they won’t let you in those places if you have chicken feed stuck to the sleeve of your coat. But they will take you on the messy, fun adventure of life most Mud and Grace readers seem to have.

Every woman needs these pieces? Even my grandma?

1. Traditional basics list: A little black dress

  1. How often do you go to cocktail parties? Formal business meetings? The funeral of someone who would have wanted you to wear black? How often do you use the word “little” to describe anything in you wardrobe?
    You can live quite happily without any of these.

     

    Mud and Grace option: A knee-length knit dress

    Comfortable, warm, easy, washable, this dress can be casual when worn with boots and tights, or dressed up with jewelry and heels. With the exception of formal events, which rarely happen in my town, this dress is always appropriate.

    I have worn this dress everywhere, even to the rare cocktail party.

    2. Traditional basics list: A black pencil skirt

It’s true, pencil skirts are flattering. But you can’t ride a bike in a pencil skirt, and you really shouldn’t pair one with Frye Boots.

Mud and Grace option: A casual skirt in a neutral color

Find a skirt that can take the place of jeans, something casual that can be dressed up when you need it to be. This skirt should make you feel fantastic, and elevate your wardrobe on days you need it, but it shouldn’t be fussy.

I can wear this anywhere and everywhere.

3. Traditional basics list: Crisp white blouse

If you love ironing, are willing to have it tailored so it lies perfectly flat along your bust, and never spill coffee on yourself, go for it. For the rest of us mortals, these shirts just aren’t worth the trouble. Plus they always feel “crispy.”

Mud and Grace option: A soft chambray shirt

A bamboo or tencel option is so soft, never needs ironing and goes with absolutely everything.

This has been in my regular rotation, all four seasons, for five years now.

4. Traditional basics list: A black blazer

I have a black blazer, and I absolutely love it. But I tend to forget about it for seasons at a time, so my wardrobe obviously functions just fine without it

Mud and Grace option: A denim or cargo jacket

These easy jackets “finish” and outfit without making your feel fussy. They are perfect for unpredictable weather, or the unpredictable heating and cooling systems in our places of work. Find a good one, wear it forever.

I love you.

5. Traditional basics list: A striped shirt

Striped shirts really are adorable, but they are not for everyone. I swear I’m one beret away from street mime the minute I put on a striped shirt.

Mud and Grace option: A plaid or gingham shirt

Still adds a bit of interest in a limited color pallet, but substantially less preppy.

One can wear this shirt and never feel as though they are trapped in an invisible box.

6. Traditional basics list: Trench coat

Let’s take a large piece of shiny, khaki fabric, spatter a bunch of buttons across the front, give it huge lapels and pretend it’s flattering!

Mud and Grace option: A great rain jacket that fits your style

You do need a great jacket to keep the rain off. That might mean a trench for you, although a single row of buttons and a darker color would probably work better for most women. Most of us can find a sharp looking, seriously rain-repellant jacket that will work well with jeans and boots.

Sharp, and actually dry.

7. Traditional basics list: Classic pumps

I do love a classic pair of pumps, and I own some… and I wear them maybe once a year. It would be wrong to call them foundational in any way.

I wore these last November. They were fine.

Mud and Grace option: Smart looking, comfortable ankle boots.

Ankle boots are less of a commitment than mid-calf or tall boots, but keep your feet warm and dry, and your outfit updated.

I have no problem wearing the same shoes for seven days in a row.

8. Traditional basics list: White sneakers

Does no one else encounter mud in this world???

Mud and Grace option: Off-white sneakers

No one will ever know how many times they’ve been through the wash

If something is the color of a stain, can you stain it?

 

  1. Traditional basics list: Good quality black, grey and white t-shirts.

OK, you actually do need these. I have them in long sleeve, short sleeve and tank top. If black, grey and white aren’t your colors, find them in the neutrals you wear, like cream, olive and navy.

They have a point here. Good t-shirts make everything easier.

 

A few week’s ago we heard Jessie’s story, about a woman who is in the process of going a full year without buying any clothes. Part of what enabled Jessie to embark on this adventure is that she had a fully functioning wardrobe at the start. Many of us will be attempting a 40-day no-buy starting October 14th. Check your basics this week, and make sure you have what you need to get dressed easily in the months to come. As traditional basics lists don’t work for me, my list may not work for you. But take the opportunity to write your own basics list, and make sure yours are in good repair and ready to roll starting October 14th.

My favorite basic is a simple white tank top.

Do you have a “basic” I didn’t include today? Let me know what your “must-have” pieces are in the comments below!

Could you go an entire year without buying any clothes?

With little fan fare and no social media postings, Jessie decided, starting February 1st, 2017, not to buy any clothes for one year. To be clear, for Jessie this is not a moral crusade. She’s not a crazy stoic, and she is the last person on earth to pass judgment on another. She just wanted to see if she could do it.

At 32-years-old, Jessie has plenty of clothes; a beautifully curated wardrobe of high quality pieces, some classic, some fun. But she found herself trapped in a cycle of always looking for something new. “Because of my size, buying clothes is a quest,” Jessie says, relating a never-ending cycle of buying on-line, returns, justification of spending, and constant searching.

Then there was the Canada Goose Jacket. If you’re not familiar with Canada Goose, it’s crazy high quality outerwear that costs about as much as triple bypass surgery. “What if I bought nothing for a year, then could I buy that coat?” she wondered. And that was the thought that changed everything. Could she buy nothing for a year, even without the lure of a purchase that could significantly impact the GDP?

“I realized I needed to break the cycle of constant shopping,” she says.

Jessie, warm and adorable despite lack of Canada Goose label.

8th months in, Jessie says, “It’s been quite a journey. I will not pretend this has been easy.” Here are a few of the realizations she’s had over the last few months.

There is a huge element of fantasy in clothes shopping

Early on Jessie learned just how much she used clothes shopping as a form of escapism. “We’re not just buying clothes,” Jessie says, “we’re buying a fantasy.”

How many of us have been there? I want to be the sort of woman who walks home to her chic loft in the city after a Zen-like yoga experience… so I buy a sweater? I’m still me, only now I’m trying to get my goats off the barn roof in a sweater that catches on everything, no yoga, no Zen, no city loft.

“We have to focus on what we want in our lives, rather than what we want to wear,” Jessie says. “Bring yourself back to what you’re actually trying to achieve by buying.” So rather than shop for a cute, warm plaid shirt, Jessie finds herself planning the camping trip that she imagined herself going on in the cute, warm plaid shirt.

You can have a really good time at a party, even if you’ve worn the dress a few times previously.

You can always find something to wear

Life goes on, as it is inclined to do whether you are buying clothes or not. Starting in the spring, Jessie’s partner Michael broke ground on a bouldering gym that had been years in the planning. Everyone has been pitching in. While Jessie’s wardrobe is full of pencil skirts and fun t-shirts, she never really invested in heavy work wear.

“I wanted to pressure wash, and despite the fact that I was born and raised in Oregon, apparently I own no rain pants. So I just took a couple of garbage bags and wrapped one around each leg,” she said of her rain bloomers. Jessie’s been wearing a pair of Ann Taylor Loft skinnies as work pants, and despite the fact that they are not Carharts and have no abundance of pockets, she’s managed to sand, drill, spray and climb in them.

When you don’t have the option of buying, Jessie says, “You really see what you reach for again and again.”

Balloon pants rule.

There will always be something new to want

The most profound realization of this year for Jessie is that if you indulge in wanting, it’s an endless cycle. You can find the perfect t-shirt, or suede bootie, but then there will always be something else to want. “It’s difficult to recognize how we are being manipulated by the media,” she says. Jessie, like so many of us, really likes looking at clothes. And there’s nothing wrong with that. But it’s a fine line between enjoying a flip through the new Patagonia catalog, and deciding you must have another cozy beanie. Part of Jessie’s journey has been recognizing that buying anything, even a Canada Goose jacket, isn’t going to stop the wanting. “We are never going to have the perfect wardrobe, because we’re never going to stop changing,” she says.

Not shopping allows you to love the clothes you have.

There is relief in choosing not to buy

“I’ve been surprised to find that the overwhelming sensation… isn’t disappointment or deprivation: it’s relief. I don’t have to play the game. And I had no idea how much energy the game was draining from me until I stopped playing,” Jessie says of taking to option to buy off the table.

“It’s like I have an emotional buffer in place, and suddenly I can analyze more objectively,” she says. “And when I feel my heart start to speed up and the cycle of craving rear its ugly head, I can shrug it off and think “Nope, not an option! Now what else do I want to put my energy into?”

In not shopping for clothing, Jessie has learned to focus on other things. “I’d never realized how shopping for and buying clothes was emotional for me,” she says. To go a year without shopping, “you have to be ready to take a good long look at the negative sides of yourself.”

So what’s next for Jessie? She’s not sure. “I don’t know what my relationship with clothes will look like after this,” she admits. But one thing is for sure, Jessie is no longer on a quest for the perfect selection of 37, color-coordinated pieces of clothing. “I’m not trying to make a flat lay, I’m trying to make a life,” she says.

“I hope to find a balance,” Jessie says of the happy place between a love of clothing and a full and rich life.

Here’s to the ongoing adventure!

Inspired by Jessie? I am. I’m planning on starting small with a two-month no-buy, dates TBA. Are you in? Let me know in the comments below, or by email, if you want to accept the No Buy Challenge, mudandgrace@gmail.com

I hope you enjoyed Jessie’s story. Please consider subscribing to Mud and Grace for more on what we wear and how it effects our lives. Next week I’ll examine the lessons learned in a year of no buying limits at all.

Back to school style for teachers

Books, papers, coffee, exploding pens, slamming lockers, split second decisions, and a constant swirl of humanity: it’s school! We’re back for another year of bright lights and big workloads, and I can’t wait. I am so grateful for this noisy, crazy, beautiful job of teaching.

Celebrating my 40th year of back-to-school!

In honor of back to school, here is the best style advice culled from my teacher friends. As Bobbie, our fashionable staff president, says “For better or worse, students notice what we wear. I want to be, and to be noticed as, confident, interesting, engaged in the world, and pulled together.”

Here are a few ways to do just that.

Set up a your outfit formulas

Reading Harry Potter, I’m always a little jealous that I don’t get to wear a long wizard’s robe to work. Forget turning myself into a cat, looking professional and being comfortable everyday would be magic enough. Fortunately, muggle and blogger Anuschka Rees has come up with the outfit formula.

Essentially, outfit formulas are combinations of clothing you know will work. My go-to formula is jeans or a moto pant, blouse and jacket. My second outfit formula is a knee length dress with boots. With the exception of an occasional sweater thrown in, my teaching formulas don’t change much. To learn more about outfit formulas, check out this post.Outfit Formulas, 101

Beautiful Helen, in her favorite pixie pant/blouse/sweater combo. 

Here are some teacher outfit formulas my friends go in for:

Helen: Old Navy Pixie pant, blouse, cardigan

Julie: Bright knit maxi dress (sandals in the summer, boots and cardi in the winter)

Ann: Long fluid top, drapey sweater, skinny pants or knee length skirt

Sarah and Dani: Jeans, quirky t-shirt, hoody.

Sarah and Dani: Seriously, would you not LOVE to be taught science by these people??

Have some fun

I don’t mean to insult other professions, but educators have a unique potential for fun. Where else can you run around acting like Louis XIV? Literally nowhere. My friends Dani and Sarah have fabulous collections of fun t-shirts, and even have matching wonder woman sweatshirts. If I’m feeling particularly spunky I might go for double denim, or a homemade message T, or twin with a co-worker or student.

Helen, who is going into elementary education, owns seven critter sweaters*

 

Maddy and me, making the day a little more fun by twinning.

Wear the gear, or the pajamas

Every teacher will at some point be asked to wear tie-dye, or her pajamas, or come to school as her favorite Dr. Seuss character. Just do it. Having a few nice tops in your school’s color will help. If you hate your school’s colors, black or white with accents of the school color works just fine.

Our staff president, rocking the axe.

You do you

Students are incredible gauges of authenticity. They will respond to your enthusiasm for a topic, tell at a glance which teachers will follow a cell phone policy and which won’t, and can smell your fear. So while I might be able to fool the lady at the DMV with a smart outfit, my students can sniff out my attempts at dress up in a heartbeat.

Elle is drawn to dramatic, fashion forward choices. Not afraid to experiment, she’s often trying new colors or shapes. Julie wears long, bright maxi dresses in teal or purple. While I can pass these women in the hall everyday and exclaim over their fabulous ensembles, the bright, elegant choices would be inauthentic on me.

Elle, looking fabulous while teaching Spanish.

Wearing clothing authentic to who we are helps us relax. And anything that lessons the tension of this somewhat crazy job is a win in my book.

Letting it all hang… in

Listen up! No one at school wants to see all y’all’s anything hanging out. Ever. You’d think I wouldn’t have to say that, but in the last 23 years of teaching you wouldn’t believe the things I’ve seen.

For the most part, teachers want to and will dress appropriately. But wardrobe malfunctions happen. A friend once wore an ill fitting pair of jeans and unwittingly had a photograph of her behind circulating on snapchat.** One day last year I wore a dress that had shrunk up in the wash, but I didn’t notice until I sat down on a stool. I ran to Ann’s classroom and she actually took off the leggings she was wearing under her more modest dress and gave them to me for the day. That’s a friend.

For every new outfit, do the bend and sit test. Bend over and see if anything falls out in front or behind. Then sit and see how far your skirt comes up, or your pants ride down, or if the change in posture produces any gaps in your top. If you have any doubts, change now.

When in doubt, just wrap yourself in a large blanket. Better safe than snapchatted.

A few more things to ponder

How are you going to haul all your stuff? A roomy bag or backpack that coordinates smartly with your outfit formulas will pull everything together. Big arm loads of papers and an old Grocery Outlet bag will not.

Can you get the marker stains off that? Teaching is a messy job, literally as well as figuratively. According to Elle you should “buy quality fabrics that can be worn and washed in real life and stay nice-looking.” White pants are almost always an elegant fashion choice but between my goats and my students I haven’t worn them in years.

How well does your school’s heating and cooling system function? In the winter, I always plan on wearing a coat that I can keep on all day if the heat isn’t functioning. In warmer months, I wear layers and sometimes even bring a pair of sandals to change into if my feet get hot. ***

Can you walk a mile in those shoes? Because you are going to. I know it’s shocking to read on Mud and Grace Style, but invest in good shoes. Every teacher who weighed in on this article stressed the importance of good shoes. If your feet hurt, you will yell at your students. This is a fact.

Bobbie is ready for anything, which is probably what the day will bring.

My final piece of advice is to make sure you have what you need. Teachers spend so much time prepping their classrooms and lessons so everything will run smoothly once the crazy whirlwind called school kicks in. Spend some time prepping your wardrobe as well. Are your tights full of holes and likely to sag? Go get new ones. Are those once-cute ankle boots still in good shape, or do they need to be resoled and cleaned? Are all your foundational garments functioning as they should, because you really don’t want to be tugging at a bra strap during class. A little prep time on your wardrobe will leave you confident as you take on the most important job anyone could wish for.

Go get ‘em!

Me and Ann, on the last day of school in our uniforms, minus the jacket or sweater.

* I think once you own more than 5 critter sweaters, you automatically go into Primary Education.

** A little known hazard of the profession

*** I hate it when my feet are too hot

I hope you enjoyed this post! Please consider subscribing to have Mud and Grace delivered directly to your mail box.

8-Step Plan for the Perfect Summer Wardrobe

Summertime! Whether you are out adventuring, lazing around the house or knocking tasks off your list, you still get to have to get dressed. And yes, you do have to wear something.*

But it’s 110 degrees!

We often neglect summer wardrobes because the season is more casual. I’ve seen a woman with a crush of holiday cocktail dresses cramping up her closet and not one great pair of shorts.** With this post, I hope to help you create a wardrobe out of which you can get dressed in a snap every morning, pack in 15 minutes or less for wherever you’re headed, and feel great in your clothes no matter what the day might bring.

Some things I wear in the summer.

This post is not earth-shatteringly different from my advice to you in the past. It is a gentle reminder to put some forethought into your closet, freeing you to spend the day on larger questions than “Does this top look OK?” What follows is a list of questions to consider as you put your wardrobe together. You can download a worksheet here.

Summer Wardrobe Planning Worksheet

What are you doing?

Look at your summer plans and think through specific clothing needs. Gardening, hiking, running kids around, flying somewhere, hanging out at the pool, wrestling goats out of the cob bin? Be specific and honest about the activities you will be engaging in. I hope to spend a lot of time writing this summer, which means sitting in a deck chair with my computer on my lap. My routine includes multiple daily runs down to the garden, so everything needs to work with dirt. I don’t have any weddings this summer, and no formal events, so I can get by with a pretty casual wardrobe.

I don’t need you, fancy dress. But man are you fun to try on!

What do you want to wear?

Last summer my wardrobe had a strong athletic vibe. This year, I feel like including a few more pretty items: soft, loose tops, easy shorts, a few more skirts. I still have my share of caves to explore and boulder problems to get shut down on, I’m just drawn to prettier items in which to do it all this year. Take some time to flip through magazines or read a few style blogs to figure out what you want. A summer full of elegant maxi dresses? Runners’ skorts with tank tops? Don’t deny that inner voice that says “Ohhhh! Pretty!” Wear what you want to wear.

I added fun shorts this summer.
See? They have a bird on them. Birds always make shorts fun.

What type of care are you willing to give to your clothing?

In my case, the answer to this question is zero. I will not iron, hand wash, steam or possibly even fold anything. I shop accordingly. Everything in my summer wardrobe can get by with a quick shake when it comes out of the dryer. If you want to trade off trips to the dry cleaner’s for a gorgeous dress, go for it. Just be clear about the realities of care your clothing will need.

You are the perfect summer shirt.

How many options do you want?

Because I don’t go in to work in the summer,*** I can get away with relatively few options. There have been lean times where I have rotated through about 4 ensembles all summer long. Now that I can afford more, I don’t always want that much more. I have another friend who has racks of fun summer dresses. She enjoys choosing from a wide variety of options.

Even my somewhat minimalist summer wardrobe includes 4 white tank tops, because I’m never not in the mood to wear a white tank top.

Where will you put your money?

Can I answer this one for you? Good shoes. Sandals, a pair of cute sneakers and you’re golden. If you bought your shoes last summer and they’re still in good condition, then you’re free to invest elsewhere. Here is a post about summer basic that can help any active woman’s wardrobe. Mud and Grace Summer Essentials

I’m pretty sure there’s a drinking game at the U of O where you take a shot every time I post a picture of these sandals.

As you budget, think about durability and longevity. That cute top at your favorite second hand store may not wear well for more than one summer, but it might just make this summer fantastic. A good pair of comfy denim shorts could last for years.

This may not last another year, but I’m going to have a great time in it while it’s here.

What do you already have that you truly love?

Have some summer favorites already? Fantastic. But those shorts look just OK? Ditch ‘em. Lay out your summer favorites and keep only those that look and feel fantastic. Use these as the base for your summer wardrobe.

Summer officially started five days ago and I have already worn this Patagonia dress on four separate outings.
If you are the last remaining Mud and Grace reader who has not bought a Columbia Skort, let this inspire you to go grab one.

Give yourself a shopping time frame

Take a week or two to knock your list out. If that means a trip down the freeway to a larger mall, spending a Saturday hitting every 2nd hand shop in town, or ordering a number of different pairs of shorts in different sizes from a catalog to be sure of a good fit, then taking care of the returns immediately, get ‘er done. Your goal should be to have everything you need hanging in your closet in a relatively short time frame.

Too busy standing in a vortex to shop.

Aaaand stop

Once you have gathered your essentials, stop shopping. You will have gotten into the habit of hunting and gathering, and that is not what you want to spend your summer doing. When your wardrobe is complete, wear it and get on with your life. If you couldn’t find something just right, live without it for this summer and try again next year. I never found a casual jersey dress that I loved. Oh well.

I’m not saying you can’t step foot in a store all summer. I delight in finding off-season steals in 2nd hand shops. This is the perfect time to find a good, used ski jacket. But if you are constantly on the prowl for this season’s clothes, you will never stop to enjoy what you have. The beauty of a functioning wardrobe is never doubting that it can see you through any occasion that comes your way.

I gave last summer’s jersey dress to a friend, because while it looked fine on me, it looked fantastic on her. I have yet to find this summer’s dress, and yet I have survived and gotten dressed every day. It’s a miracle.

Putting the time and energy into your summer wardrobe will set you up for summer after summer of easy wardrobe maintenance. Once you have everything you need for one summer, you’ll have an excellent base for the next summer. Then suit up and get out there and have some fun!

Happy Summer!

Need more shopping advice? Check out my post Shopping 101

* “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” –Mark Twain

**You know who you are.

*** Whoop! Whoop!

 

Dos and Don’t of the Statement T-Shirt

T-shirts are far and away the most fun pieces of clothing. Comfy, soft and colorful, our t-shirts can actively express our feelings, personalities and daily moods.

This week I teamed up with Jenna, Maddy, Talia, Melissa, Julia and Lucy on their last day of high school to figure out right way to wear a statement tee.

Jenna, Lucy, Maddy, me, Julia, Melissa and Talia in our statement tees.

What follows are a list of Dos and Don’ts for the statement tee.

Do wear that statement tee if…

It reminds you of good times: If you have a t-shirt from a fun summer softball league, a favorite play, your 7th grade chess championship game where you came in last but still had a great time, these are always, aways appropriate.

Melissa is wearing a shirt from her grade school that she “borrowed” from her former teacher, the beloved Sally Krueger.

It perks you up, and shares some fun with the world: There are a ton of fun message Ts out there that just bring a smile to your face. If you find one you love, go for it.

Jenna, in an adorable happy planet T
My daughter Margaret, in the “Ask me about my goat” t-shirt that Maddy gave me and Margaret quickly stole.

If references your loyalties: School, team, band, Hogwarts house of choice, an outward statement of your loyalties can be a conversation starter, as well as just throwing some support into the universe for something you believe in.

Every college Julia applied to was hurling scholarship money at her in an attempt to lure her their way. In the end, she accepted Syracuse, and says so proudly with this t-shirt.
When Julie and I saw Duran Duran in concert last summer, Simon Le Bon came out for the last set in a t-shirt like this one. I made matching 1978 tees for me and Julie to remember the fabulous fun we had that night.*

It’s funny: Some t-shirts are just plain funny. If you find one, enjoy the joke and let others in on it too.

Jessie at Bishop, expressing her opinion on sleeves.

It makes a statement about you: There are plenty of statements worth making. We can use our fashion choices to stand up for something we believe in, or simply state how we want the world to be.

This small and slightly blurry picture of Lucy (Nasty Woman) and Maddie (Stay Weird) tells you what to expect from this pair of brilliant girls. 

You love it: Sometimes, you come across a statement tee you just plain love. Wear that shirt and others like it as much as you want.

Talia wears Patagonia pocket tees all the time. They look fantastic.
The girls made me a t-shirt with silly pictures of all of them collaged onto it. I love it more than words can say.
A close up shot of the Greatest Shirt of All Times and Peoples.

Statement Tees to avoid: Some statement Ts are a don’t. Everyone is going to have her own opinion here, but these are my personal guidelines.

The Boastful T: It’s one thing to see a 9-year-old in a Nike “Been there, won that” t-shirt. Her brain is not fully developed yet, and her sports-oriented aunt-with-no-children probably thought it was adorable when she bought it. The rest of us can refrain from shirts that talk about how we destroy on the soccer pitch, can’t lose playing Connect Four, or whatever.

The fact that this fits a 7-year-old makes it extra funny.

The Whining T: I am sorry if you didn’t get your coffee / don’t like my face / are bored with the world at large, but advertising that fact on your t-shirt doesn’t do much for anyone. Even, and especially, the sad person who feels the need to express their general unhappiness on their chest while rolling about in this world.

If you wear this in class I’m gonna make you turn it inside out.

The contradiction: An environmental message on a mass-produced, $5 t-shirt from Target? You are never going to feel right wearing this. Ditto goes for anything that says Namaste unless you are actually doing Yoga / Meditating / attempting to communicate in Hindi while bowing to the divine in someone else. Statement Tees are only cool when they are authentic.

This is so wrong I don’t even know where to begin.

The concert you didn’t attend: You may love a band or musician, but a fake faded t-shirt of a concert you didn’t attend looks a little silly. The only exception to this rule is if you find an actual faded concert t-shirt in one of your parent’s or older sibling’s drawers. That’s cool.

Dad, please tell me you kept this shirt.

So there you have it, the dos and don’t of statement tees. Do you have a favorite t-shirt? Send in a picture, the Mud and Grace community would love to see it!

* When you make your friend a t-shirt, do not, under any circumstances, deliver the t-shirt in a timely manner. Be sure to forget to bring it to their birthday party, leave it at home if you are meeting for lunch, whatever you have to do. Keep that shirt for months, even a full year! That way you can celebrate the anniversary of the t-shirt inspiring event by wearing matching shirts and apologizing profusely.

No one can stop looking at my amazing t-shirt. Except for Melissa and Talia.

Color Boot Camp: The Two-Week Color Challenge

Full truth: I’m not completely comfortable with color. I understand it well enough to put together a decent ensemble and coordinate a micro-capsule, but what I haven’t taken the time to learn is how to coordinate my colors with myself.

I just don’t get it.

All that spring, summer, fall business of Carole Jackson’s Color Me Beautiful never really worked on me, and there aren’t a lot of alternate color theories out there. So for the past 40 years my color selection has been somewhat hit or miss. The occasional red or pink top mixed in with lots and lots of gray, blue and olive.

Hard to deny there’s a pretty clear pattern here.

Confirmation bias* at the ready, I made excuses for myself when confronted with an article that chided me to “bring more color into your wardrobe!” Some of my best were: ‘Gray is minimalist and elegant,’ or ‘Color makes me look like I’m trying too hard,’ and my personal favorite self-deception, ‘I look good in gray.’

Color is powerful, and beautiful. It can cheer us up, brighten our eyes and skin, draw attention exactly where we want it, send a clear message, and done right it looks fantastic. So after what feels like the longest, grayest winter in Oregon history,** I’m ready to tackle this color issue head on.

This is going to be fun.

Thus I invite you to Color Boot Camp, a two-week color-wearing challenge. The purpose is to find out what colors look best on you, and finally get comfortable wearing them. Here are the rules:

Rule # 1: Actively select a different color to wear next to your face every day. This is the time to break out all those well-intentioned purchases of colorful blouses and dresses you haven’t gotten around to wearing. Borrow tops from a friend if you need to.*** We have 14 days, so if you really want to explore the effects black, white or gray, it’s OK to wear them each once. The other 11 days need to be colors. And since I’m assuming you don’t have 14 solid colored tops lined up Roy G Biv in your closet, patterns are a go, as are different shades of the same color, within reason.****

Rule #2: Keep a record of responses. While I don’t expect strangers to say “Wow, that sea foam blue really brightens your complexion,” I do expect friends, co-workers and family members will react to you as people generally do. Listen for things like, “I love that top!” “You look pretty / rested / great, etc.” or, “Your eyes look really beautiful today.” Any positive comment counts, as the people in your life are not necessarily color experts and may have no idea why you look great.

Rule #3: Keep a record of how you feel. What do these colors do for your mood? Do you feel bright, elegant, hopeful, energized… or conspicuous, sallow, like you want to curl up in a pile of gray jersey and just forget the whole thing? The most important factor in a choosing color for your wardrobe is how it makes you feel. There are certain pastels in which I feel exactly like a troll doll, and I won’t be wearing them no matter how much they bring out my eyes.

This top and sweater are obviously feeling pretty good about themselves.

Special considerations: If you wear a uniform to work, you may want to stretch out your challenge to include a few more weekends and nights off. If you have no interest in bringing color into your wardrobe, just skip the whole thing.

And that’s it. Two weeks, 14 colors, we can do it! If you come across a particularly great color on yourself, send me a picture and I’ll include it in the wrap up post in two weeks!

Let me know if you want to borrow this, because I only get to wear it once in the next two weeks.

*Confirmation bias is the human tendency to seek out information that confirms what we already believe. Like when you click on that article about how drinking red wine leads to weight loss and completely ignore all the others about exercise, diet and sleep. Not that I ever clicked on that article or anything…

** 144 days of rain

***Seriously, message me. I’ve got lots.

****I’m talking to you, Miss 15 shades of light blue

Simplify Your Life With Micro-Capsule Wardrobes

I am not a minimalist. As much as I admire people who live in crazy-clean houses with a curated selection of all-white clothing, that’s just not me. But I’m perfectly happy to hone in on the idea of minimalism if it leads me to a thoughtfully prepared collection of great looking clothes.

As discussed in last week’s post, a full-on capsule wardrobe, while fabulously trendy, isn’t for everyone. But there are areas in our lives where paring down choices and increasing the quality of what we wear can make getting dressed more simple and satisfying.

What follows are a series of micro-capsules. These are little pockets of clothing for specific areas of your life. I began to build these capsules for activities I engage in regularly, but I never felt I had the right thing to wear. Your tricky spots may be different from mine, but hopefully these will serve as an inspiration to get you started on your own micro-capsules.

  1. Camping
Sample summer camping capsule, all you would have to add is a rain jacket. This is all from Title Nine**

My family and I are not exactly glampers. We’re more grunge camper than glam camper.* That said, I still want my clothes to fit well and look good, even if I will be sleeping in them.

How much do you need? Two tops, two bottoms, one base layer of silk or wool, one outer layer (cozy top and pants you can wear over other garments) and depending on the situation, one coat and/or rain gear and/or something you can swim in.

What should you look for? Quality and color. Outdoor gear is one area of your life where the quality of your clothing cannot be overlooked. A poorly made rain jacket is not a rain jacket; it’s just something that will collect rain and keep it sealed into your clothing for the duration of your trip. Buy a few good pieces in coordinating colors and wear them forever.

My winter camping capsule.

2. Cheering

After the sixth straight track meet of not knowing what to wear I finally accepted that I had a problem. With two athleticly-minded children and a coach for a husband, I spend a good deal of my free time clapping and encouraging people to run fast, hold a block, or get that dyno. Creating a uniform that I could slip on easily for these events has been a huge relief. No more shivering,** limping around a muddy field in the wrong shoes, or inadvertently showing up in the colors of the opposing team.

How much do you need? Two or three tops, one ball cap or beanie, neutral pants and appropriate shoes. For outdoor sports make sure you have at least one sweatshirt/sweater, and appropriate outerwear.

What should you look for? Color. You don’t have to wear official fan gear or a pin with your child’s face on it, just the color of the team is enough.

Purple… green… it’s all good so long as my feet are dry.

Special note: Outerwear. If you attend a lot of outdoor sports, a good coat in the appropriate color makes getting dressed for these events ridiculously simple. My friend Lynnette had a deep purple jacket she wore to watch her son’s soccer games for years. Another option is to do a black coat with a team-appropriate scarf or hat. Since our family cheers on two rival teams (we get a lot of funny looks at cross country meets) we bought grandma a good black coat and made her scarves in both purple and green.

3. Workout

This would be the appropriate place to show you a picture of the perfect micro-capsule I’ve created for myself, but the truth is I don’t have one yet. I’m exploring workout options and trying to pare down the mess of workout clothing I’ve amassed. Look for a post on workout wear coming soon.

The world’s least inspiring photo.

How much do you need? Two complete ensembles for every type of work out you do regularly, and then one more for each day of the week you do it. (So if you go to spin class once a week, two ensembles. If you go twice a week, three ensembles.)

What should you look for? Feel and function. Slipping into comfortable, good looking workout clothes is so much more motivating than stuffing yourself into the ratty old spandex shorts you never liked to begin with. The clothes also need to function properly. Running tights that slip down, workout tops that ride up should be banished from your closet, stat.

Special note: Wear and tear. Sadly, some workout clothes wear out pretty quickly. Keep an eye on your workout capsule and make sure you replace smelly, pilled and frayed pieces regularly.

I could run in this, I guess. Honestly work out gear is my fashion struggle.

4. Loungewear

This was the first micro-capsule I created, and it has been such a luxury. You can read more about it here. (Perfect 10-Item Loungewear Capsule )The basic concept is that creating a simple, flexible loungewear capsule makes self-care reflexive and easy.

How much do you need: I have of two pairs of leggings, three sweatshirts, one pair of joggers, one stretchy black skirt, t-shirts in varying sleeve length, slippers and boots.

What should you look for: Quality and comfort. My loungewear capsule includes the most expensive pieces I own. These quality pieces feel amazing, wash up well, and look fantastic season after season.

This is my loungewear capsule, which I photographed while the pieces themselves were lounging.

A final word: All of these micro-capsule wardrobes are living entities. Over time your needs will change, pieces will wear out, and new items will filter in. If you find you are not utilizing a capsule, reevaluate its contents and purpose. If you find you want more options for a certain area of your life, abandon the capsule completely. Try to keep your capsules fluid, you can and should use pieces from one capsule in another. My fantastic plum colored lounging sweatshirt looks great at a track meet and enjoys going camping with me.

I can belay my husband in fan wear.

These little interlocking mini-wardrobes have helped cut decision-making and ensure that I feel comfortable and stylish in all aspects of my life. Sometimes I had to get rid of wardrobe debris and other times I had to lay down cash to buy what I needed. To create your own micro-capsule think about the following questions:

Which activities in your life that have you stymied as you stand in front of your closet?

What is the bare minimum you would need to have a decent selection each time you dress for this activity?

What is the highest quality you can afford?

Which colors would work well for the activity, and go together so you can mix and match all the pieces?

Investing a little time to create a few mix-and-match, go-to outfits allows you to forget about your clothes as you get on with the fantastic business of being you. I’d love to hear about the micro-capsules you create. Comment below and let me know how it goes!

 

*What would you call a grunge camper? A Gramper?

** There are things I love and hate about Title Nine. Love: the ethic, the thoughtful coordinating of fun colors, most of the quality, the swimwear. Hate: the price, the percentage of women riding bikes and skateboards with no helmets in their advertising, a lot of the fit of their clothing.

*** OK, I was shivering at the Kelly meet in early April, but no one expected that wind.

 

Signature Style: Your words, your look

“Define your style!” the quiz lures me in with promises of a definitive label for my look, along with a handy shopping list for the perfect capsule wardrobe.

Dutifully I start ticking off answers. All too soon it becomes apparent that there are not only no right answers, there are no right questions either.  But I keep trying, assuming the problem is me and not the quiz. When I finish the numbers proclaim me somewhere between a French minimalist* and a preppy, and that’s only because I can’t in anyway be considered a glamorista or modernist. Then the quiz tells me to go buy a trench coat and some ballet flats, and I throw the whole thing out in disgust.

Do I prefer an arm load of bangals or a Cartier diamond watch? Why is there no space in this quiz for a leather band held together with a gold buckle?

Are those really my only options? French minimalists, preppy, glamorista and modernist?

Not according to Hollywood costumer Alison Freer. In her book How to Get Dressed**, she suggests that we should all strive to be the costume designer of our own life by developing a signature style. While that sounds like the baffling sort of thing only crazy, high-achieving women do, it turns out to be both simple and brilliantly freeing.

Freer suggests you start by making a list of things you love. There need be no actual connection to clothes, just list things you are drawn to. Soon you will see patterns emerging. Elements of your heritage, tastes and interests will simmer there on the list, eventually bubbling up into a cohesive style. Freer suggests grabbing a thesaurus if you need to find just the right words for your style.

Then name your look. Be playful and have fun with it. This works like magic. Once I discovered the thrill of Freer’s technique I began trying to name the styles of friends: “Quirky preppy,” “European Eugenian,” and “1970s trust-fund on the run.” Freer describes her own style as “Backwoods Nuveaux,” combining her Texas roots with a heavy 1980s new wave influence.

I call this look of Ann’s “Elegant Ease.”

What follows was my own process: First the list –

It took less than 10 minutes to list my words, and I was surprised to see what came up in a stream-of-consciousness “Things I like” list. Then I just stared at it for a while. And like reading an alethiometer or creating a patronus, it was just there.

1940s Pin-up Hiker.

This picture just says it all.

Everything became clear. This is why I wear pearls with cargo pants. The 1940s pin-up hiker has a curvier figure, rather than then the willowy women I see in the Prana catalog. Her active wear is well made and meant to last seasons if not generations. She smiles. My 1940s pin-up hiker look is wool, cotton, linen, denim and silk. It’s neutral colors and classic accessories. The look is unapologetically feminine and sporty.

But this signature style doesn’t quite fit all my moods. Freer suggests we all have more than one signature style waiting to walk out of our lists. I stared at the words a little longer until I put my finger on the look I have been unwittingly moving into for the last 8 years.

Stepford hippie

There has always been something about the well-heeled suburbanite woman that fascinates me: the shiny-clean house, the finely tuned to-do lists, the Olympian commitment to physical appearance. But I would never want that life. I have too much affinity for the mess and chaos of this world to settle down into well-ordered perfection.

I may drive a mom car, but I’ve also slept in it.

My Stepford Hippie looks says, “Yes, I got my kids to all their sports practices on time, and have the most delicious, nutrient rich meal in my shiny clean crockpot. But I got it all done because I’m wearing a special Tiger’s Eye necklace I bought in Sedona to engage the vibrations of the vortex in my everyday life.”

Stepford Hippie is second hand Hunter mud boots. It’s the perfect jeans, diamond stud earrings*** with a hand-me-down boho top. My Stepford Hippie follows most of the rules, most of the time. The look embraces my roll as a mom and wife, and as an individual.

Words are powerful. So take your time in choosing just the right phrase for your look. Once you have established your own, signature style, getting dressed is a breeze. Shopping becomes so much easier. Rather than being handed a list of “French minimalist capsule” pieces**** that may or may not work with your body or your life, you decide.

 

* Why is it always French minimalist? Why not Polish minimalist? Or Norse maximalist?

** If you jump over to the Book List tab you’ll find a link to Amazon for this book.

*** Always faux or second hand. The Stepford Hippie isn’t giving one penny of her money to the diamond industry.

**** I honestly have no use for a trench coat.

Playing the Trends: A guide to using momentary fashion for a lifetime of style

Welcome back to Mud and Grace Style! I want to start by thanking you all for making last week’s post the most read, most shared post in the 7-month history of Mud and Grace. While I knew I needed to write about body image if I was going to write about style, I had no idea people would react to it so strongly. It seems that many of us have a body/stress connection that plays out on our closet floor each morning, proving once again that clothes are so much more than just a way to keep ourselves warm. Thank you for joining ranks in this battle for the right to feel good in our own skin.

Me, being super happy all week long. Also attempting to eat an avocado with with corn chips.

Now on to today’s topic: Playing the Trends.

Today’s trends are largely created by the fashion industry to make you spend more money. I hate to be so glum, but there you have it. On the other hand, trends are often fun, creative ways of expressing yourself. To pretend that they don’t exist or that they don’t affect us would be silly. Like, just because Mother’s Day is over-commercialized doesn’t mean I’m going to boycott presents and my family cooking for me on a nice Sunday in May, right?

You don’t want to be a slave to trends, that’s uncool. Nor do you want to ignore them all together, that’s just stubborn. Ultimately, you want to develop a good working relationship with trends, so that you are the master of what you buy, what you wear, and what you communicate to the world through your clothing.

To get there, I’m going to investigate types of trends, then look at how you can apply them to your wardrobe. Stay tuned for next week when I discuss Spring 2017 trends, what I plan to incorporate, and what I will pass on this time around.

A sneak peak at next week’s post.

Trend types

To understand how to make trends work for us we first need to understand what they are. Most trends can be broken down into the three following categories.

Long-term trends

Long terms trends are patterns of dress that reflect the aesthetic of a time period. Think the tiny waists of the 1950s, or the men’s leisure suits of the 1970s. Long term trends last 8-12 years,* and are generally seen in the shape and purpose of clothing. Currently, fitted pants are the long-term trend for men, as opposed to the massive baggies that were in throughout the 1990s.

This long term trend is no longer in style for men. Thankfully.

Seasonal trends

Seasonal trends are the pieces that flood stores regularly at the beginning and middle of each season. A so-called “it bag” or a specific height of boot can be on-trend for a season, talked up in magazines and on line, then passed over for the next bag, or new boot height. Color is the most noticeable of the seasonal trends. It will seem like robin’s egg blue is everywhere, until suddenly it isn’t. A seasonal trend can get so much air-time that it is exhausted, and we’re all mighty sick of looking at it. Until the next time it comes back, which might be in 6 months or 12 years.

This season’s boho top.

On-trend classics

These are classic pieces that are always in style, but occasionally get so much play on the runway, and then in stores and magazines, that they become trendy. Striped shirts are having a moment right now. That doesn’t mean they will be out of style next fall, they just won’t be on trend.

 

Sometimes work boots are on trend, sometimes they aren’t. I just keep wearing mine all winter, every winter.

Basic trend tricks

  • When trying out a new trend, I suggest second hand shopping first, to lessen the impact on your wallet and the environment. In most towns there are high-end resale shops that only sell current, on-trend clothing.**
  • Keep it low-key by finding the item in a fabric, color or cut in which you are already comfortable
  • Pair the new item with your favorite pieces and give it a good, honest try. Three wears is enough to know if it’s going to work for you.
  • If something was really trendy last year, tuck it away for a breather. I have a few high-low hem shirts that need a rest.
I found a bomber jacket in a comfortable denim. If I really like it, I’ll invest in a beautiful leather one.

Classic country music saves you from becoming fashion’s victim

The ultimate truth about working trends can be found simply in the words of Kenny Rodgers: You gotta know when to hold ‘em, know when to fold ‘em. Know when to walk away, know when to run.

If you are sadly unfamiliar with this song, here it is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jj4nJ1YEAp4

And if you didn’t have a childhood, here is the Muppet’s version

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNnrTNFWcsg

Kenny Rodgers, in a classic white oxford with a decidedly 1970s collar and gold chain, Muppet in snazzy bomber.

Know when to hold ‘em

Occasionally a trend comes blowing through that is so you, you want to buy out the front window of every store you pass. Maybe you love the bright florals we’ve been seeing recently, or feel fantastic in a bomber jacket. In these cases, buy the best quality pieces you can afford. It won’t read “trendy” when it’s beautifully made and fits you perfectly. Right now, you can find beautifully embroidered denim. If you invest is a well-made piece with classic lines, you can easily wear it for years. Right now it will seem trendy, and in a year it will be an essential in your own, unique style.

Over time, a silhouette may go out of style (Think paper-bag cinched waists of the 1980s) In these cases, you can either have the item altered to fit the current aesthetic, or tuck it away until it comes back (Think the paper-bag cinched waist of the spring, 2017 runways.)

I hope my friend Elle never lets go of this  gorgeous top. Here she has paired it with classic dark denim and nude heels. Perfect classic-with-an-edge-Elle.

Know when to fold ‘em***

Trying a trend just for the sake of trying something new is fantastic. And if it doesn’t work, it doesn’t work. Fold it up, and place it in the resale pile.

I tried my best with boyfriend jeans. There are women who can wear these sagging, distressed creations and look really cool. I cannot. I don’t look like an LA fashion model who rolled out of her artist / DJ boyfriend’s bed and pulled on his pants on her way to a photo shoot. I look like a mom, wearing mom jeans that she rolled up at the cuffs.

I don’t have to try that again.

When a trend doesn’t feel like you, move on. It doesn’t matter how much you spent, or that you only wore it three times, or that your best friend looks fantastic in it, if it’s not you, it’s not you. Throw in the cards and wait for the next shuffle.

Not you? That’s fine. It’s not 1978 anymore.

Know when to walk away

Growing up in Eugene, I had a friend with a stay-at-home mom who wore polyester pants suits and her hair in a fantastic Beehive hairdo. The year was 1980. I have no doubt that when she married, the suit and the hair were at the height of fashion, but a 30-something women in 1980 probably should have moved on.

There will be times when you gleefully master a long running trend. Maybe it’s athleisure, or skinny jeans. You rock it season after season, and look fantastic. Then one day, you will wake up and the trend is over. Really over.

At these times, you’ll want to carefully rethink the outfit formula you’d been wearing, and reimagine it in a more modern feel. Having trouble accepting the waning years of fuzzy Ugg boots? Try Hudson rain boots with cozy liners. It’s OK to be sad. I had to give up double denim for 18 years. But now it’s back!

All I had to do was wait.

Know when to run

Sometimes, a trend just doesn’t work. I never felt comfortable exposing my middle, not in the early 1980s, not in the mid-1990s and not now. It makes me cold and feels too cheeky for me. If you don’t feel absolutely fantastic, just run. I don’t like wearing leggings in public, even on my way to the climbing gym. Many, many other people wear leggings all day, everyday. It would be completely stylish to run my Saturday errands in leggings but I won’t. Trends will roll through and while I can love them on other people, I can skip them and remain stylish. Any attempt to solider on in a trend that doesn’t work for me will only render me fashion’s victim, and even Kenny Rodgers’ down-and-out gambler would call me on that.

In my world, leggings are for reading, not for actually getting anything done.

I hope this broad overview is helpful as you negotiate the flood of spring trends coming our way. Tune in next week for my take on this year’s looks.

*I just completely made that up, but I think it’s largely true.

** If you don’t, let me know when you are in Eugene and I will take you to Buffalo

***Actually, you fold ‘em when they come out of the laundry, and in truth my husband does the folding at our house (yes, I am that lucky) so I don’t fold anything, on trend or not.

**** Wait, there weren’t four asterisks anywhere in this post! But I wanted to ask if you’d thought about subscribing. You can just put your email into the box up at the top right and Mud and Grace will come straight to your home (OK, in-box, whatever) each week with no unnecessary clicking involved! Plus my heart always jumps a little when there is a new subscriber.